Trees & Shrubs Species

  PRICING - TREES & SHRUBS



   Unit Price by Quantity        

Approximate Container Sizes



1-49
50-499
>500
#1 Container
All Sizes
$6.50
$5.75
$5.50
7” deep x 6” diameter
#2 Container
All Sizes
$10.75
$9.25
$9.00
9” deep x 8” diameter
#3 Container
All Sizes
$14.50
$13.50
$12.75
9.63” deep x11” diameter
#7 Container
All Sizes
$40.00
$37.50
$35.00
11.5” deep x 13.5” diameter



32-96
97-960
961+

Tubelings
32 / tray
$1.90
$1.35
$1.10
4” deep x 2.25” diameter
Tree Tubes

$2.90
$2.35
$2.10
10” deep x 2.25” diameter

*Tubelings (AKA seedlings), are grown 32 cells/tray.  Range in size from 6-24” depending on species and time of the year purchased.
  • Please note that all species are not necessarily available in each container size.
  • Container sizes typically grown are indicated after each plant description.
  • All species may be custom grown in larger or smaller containers upon request.

PRICE EXCEPTIONS - Plants listed below are exceptions to our master price list.


ITEM                                                              SIZE                            1-49                 50-499             500+
ARCTOSTAPHYLOS UVA-URSI                          
COMPTONIA PEREGRINA                       #1 Container                $8.00               $7.25               $6.75
RHODODENDRON VISCOSUM 
VACCINIUM ANGUSTIFOLIUM  


 *Please Contact Our Office For Availability*


CLICK ON PLANT NAME FOR DETAILED PLANT PROFILE
                       
TREES AND SHRUBS                                             Cont. #
ACER RUBRUM (red maple): a large tree with attractive fall foliage, usually found in moist to wet sites.  Widest north to south range of any tree species along the East Coast.  40-60’ can reach 100’.  FAC
2, 3, T
ACER SACCHARINUM (silver maple): large, often multi-stemmed tree of streambanks, flood plains & swamps. A very rapid grower, often more than 5’ per year.  50-70’.  FACW
2, 3, T
ACER SACCHARUM (sugar maple): a slow growing large tree with dark green leaves.  Known for its fall color display of yellows, oranges and reds.  Hardy to zone 4.   60-70’.  FACU-
2, T
ALNUS SERRULATA (smooth alder):  multi-stemmed, nitrogen-fixing shrub of wet soils around water.  A good wetland indicator plant, with southern and northern range.  To 20’.  OBL
1, T

AMELANCHIER CANADENSIS (shadbush):  large shrub or small tree.  The name shadbush derives from showy masses of white flowers that bloom when shad are migrating upstream.  6-20’. FAC
2, T
ARCTOSTAPHYLOS UVA-URSI (bearberry):  low growing, glossy-leaved evergreen ground cover of sandy, acid soils. Tolerant of salt spray but will not grow on wet sites.  6-12” tall and 4’ wide. UPL
1, T
ASIMINA TRILOBA (pawpaw): colonial shrub/small tree with large, edible fruit.  Maroon flowers appear in early spring.  Found in rich forests and valleys.  15’-40’. FACU+
T
BACCHARIS HALIMIFOLIA (groundsel tree): medium height, deciduous shrub of irregularly flooded salt & brackish marshes & in open woods along the coast. Cotton-like white flowers & alternate branches. 5-12’. FACW
1, T

BETULA ALLEGHANIENSIS (yellow birch): medium to tall tree with peeling golden-yellow or silvery-gray bark. Found in cool, seasonally flooded, forested wetlands & rich moist upland woods. 60-75’ can reach 100’ FAC
2, 3, T
BETULA LENTA (sweet birch): medium height tree with dark plated bark at maturity.   Twigs have a strong birch beer odor.  Often found in rich, moist woods.  50-55’ can reach 80’. FACU
2, 3, T
BETULA NIGRA (river birch): medium height tree of wet soils along stream banks, lakes, swamps & flood plains.  Young trees & smaller limbs have reddish brown exfoliating bark.  40-70’ can reach 90’. FACW
2, 3, T
BETULA POPULIFOLIA (gray birch): small, often multi-stemmed tree with white bark.  Similar to paper birch but smaller & with a more southerly range.  A pioneer species. 20-40’. FAC
2, 3, T

CARPINUS CAROLINIANA (ironwood): small, single-trunk or multi-stemmed tree with smooth silvery bark.  Prefers deep, rich, moist soil and tolerates deep shade.  40-60’ can reach 100’.  FAC
2, T
CARYA GLABRA (pignut hickory): native to mountains and Piedmont on dry ridge tops and side slopes.  Also found in moist sites.  Pear-shaped nut in September and October.  80-135’.  FACU-
Tree Tube
CARYA OVATA (shagbark hickory): named for its loosely-plated bark.  Sweet nuts are edible to many wildlife species.  Heavy tap root lends to its Windfirm rating on most sites.  70-100’.  FACU-
Tree Tube
CARYA TOMENTOSA (mockernut hickory): long-lived hickory performs best in deep, fertile, upland soils.  The most abundantly found of all hickories.  60-90’.  NI
Tree
Tube
CEANOTHUS AMERICANUS (New Jersey tea): low, compact shrub up to about 4’, with panicles of small, white flowers in early summer.  Prefers light, well drained soil.  A nitrogen fixer. 2-4’.  UPL
1
CELTIS OCCIDENTALIS (hackberry): a medium size tree in the northeast, with distinctive ‘warts’ on smooth, light gray bark.  Very tolerant of dry and windy conditions.  25’-50’.  FACU
2, T
CEPHALANTHUS OCCIDENTALIS (buttonbush): medium size shrub often growing in 1 ft. or more of water. Globed, white flowers clustered together forming 1.5” buttons. Good wetland indicator plant. 3-6’up to 15’ OBL
1, T
CERCIS CANADENSIS (eastern redbud): small tree with heart-shaped leaves tapering to a pointed tip.  Magenta flowers are very showy in early spring.  To 20’, sometimes taller. 20-30’.  FACU-
2, T
CHAMAECYPARIS THYOIDES (atlantic white-cedar):  graceful evergreen tree usually found in dense stands on very wet sites of the outer coastal plain.  Good wetland indicator plant.  40-50’ can reach 75’.  OBL
2, T
CLETHRA ALNIFOLIA (sweet pepperbush or summersweet): medium size shrub of wetlands, swamps & sandy woods.  Racemes of  very fragrant, white flowers blossom in mid-summer.  3-8’ larger in moist soil. FAC+
1, T
COMPTONIA PEREGRINA (sweet fern): low shrub of dry ground with slender, erect branches developing a broad, flat topped to rounded outline as it spreads. Fern-like leaves & stems have a distinct spicy odor. 2-4’.  UPL
1
CORNUS AMOMUM (silky dogwood): medium size shrub of forested wetlands, streambanks & moist woods. Young twigs are reddish to purplish with tan pith.  White flowers & dark blue berries.  6-10’. FACW
1, T

CORNUS FLORIDA (flowering dogwood): a small, round-crowned, shade tolerant tree which rarely exceeds 25’ in height.  Found on rich, deep, dry to moist soils.  Ornamental in the landscape.  20-40’. FACU
2, T

CORNUS RACEMOSA (gray dogwood):  medium to large deciduous shrub forming large colonies.  Young stems are light reddish brown & turn gray with age.  White to light brown pith with white berries.  10-15’. UPL
1, T
CORNUS SERICEA (redosier or red-twig dogwood):  medium size, deciduous shrub with brilliant red stems. White flowers, white pith & white berries.  Roots easily & excellent for stream bank stabilization.  6-10’. FACW+
1, T

DIOSPYROS VIRGINIANA (common persimmon): small to medium tree of moist & dry sites.  Many species of wildlife feed on the fruit.  A good choice for reclamation of mine spoils or landfills.  35-60’  FAC-
2, T
FAGUS GRANDIFOLIA (American beech): stately tree of moist, rich uplands & well-drained lowlands.  Bark smooth & silvery with age. Nuts preferred by wildlife. New buds & leaves covered with silky hairs. 50-70’. FACU
2, T
HAMAMELIS VIRGINIANA (witch-hazel): large shrub, native to much of the eastern U.S.  Noted for its spectacular yellow fall foliage & yellow flowers which bloom in late fall to early winter.  20-30’. FAC-
1, T

ILEX GLABRA (inkberry holly): midsized evergreen, dioecious shrub of acidic soils.  Prefers moisture but can tolerate dry conditions.  The only Ilex species to sucker. 6-8’.  FACW-
1, T
ILEX OPACA (American holly): large slow growing evergreen.  Small white flowers in late spring, red fruit maturing in fall and lasting into winter.  Prefers moist well drained soil.  40-50’.  FACU+
2, T
ILEX VERTICILLATA (winterberry holly): medium size, deciduous, multi-stemmed, dioecious shrub of swamps & forested wetlands.  Bright red berries in fall & winter are a good wildlife food. 6-10’. FACW+
1, T
ITEA VIRGINICA (Virginia sweetspire ): small deciduous shrub of wet acidic sites.  Very ornamental with fragrant white flowers in the late spring & lovely burgundy fall color.  3-6’ can reach 10’.  OBL
1, T
IVA FRUTESCENS (high-tide bush): deciduous shrub of irregularly flooded salt marshes and ditches.  Similar to Baccharis, but has opposite branching and different seed heads.  6-10’.  FACW+
1, T
JUNIPERUS VIRGINIANA (eastern red-cedar): small to medium height evergreen tree of well drained sites.  Variable in habit, seed of this species is spread by birds & readily colonizes old fields.  40-50’. FACU
1, 2, T
LINDERA BENZOIN (spicebush): broadleaf shrub usually found in forested wetlands or moist, upland woods.  Can tolerate shade.  Yellow fall foliage and scarlet fruits.  6-12’.  FACW-
1, T

LIQUIDAMBAR STYRACIFLUA (sweet gum): large, straight-boled tree with star shaped leaves.  Often grows in dense stands on wet sites.  Fast growing and very adaptable.  60-80’. FAC
2, 3, T
LIRIODENDRON TULIPIFERA (tulip-poplar): very tall, straight-boled tree of moist, well-drained sites.  Distinctive 4-lobed leaves & attractive flowers. Member of the magnolia family. 70-90’ can reach 120’.  FACU
2, 3, T
MAGNOLIA VIRGINIANA (sweetbay magnolia): small tree or large shrub of acid wet soils.  Showy, aromatic flowers, semi-evergreen leaves & brilliant, red fruit make this species very ornamental.  10-30’. FACW
2, T
MORELLA CERIFERA (wax myrtle):  evergreen shrub more common in southern Mid-Atlantic.  Found on brackish sites and in upland woods.  A nitrogen fixer.  10-15’.  FAC
1, T
MORELLA PENSYLVANICA (northern bayberry): medium size, semi-evergreen shrub found on a variety of sites. Aromatic leaves & berries. Salt tolerant, good for coastal & highway plantings. A nitrogen fixer.5-12’. FAC
1, T
NYSSA SYLVATICA (black gum):  medium to large tree with simple, entire leaves, often growing in forested wetlands & moist uplands.  Bright red fall color, one of the first species to turn in the fall.  30-50’. FAC
2, T

PARTHENOCISSUS QUINQUEFOLIA (Virginia creeper): native vine that trails along ground or climbs on vegetation by means of adhesive tendrils.  Compound leaves divided into 5 leaflets.  FACU
1, T
PHOTINIA MELANOCARPA (black chokeberry): very similar to red chokeberry except berries are black on hairless stalks and twigs & lower leaf surfaces are smooth. 3-10’. FAC
1, T

PHOTINIA PYRIFOLIA (red chokeberry):  shrub with densely hairy lower leaf surfaces.  Found in forested wetlands & shrub bogs.  White to pink flowers on hairy stalks developing into ¼” red fruits. 5-10’.  FACW
1, T
PINUS ECHINATA (shortleaf pine): 2 & 3 needles per fascicle.  This fire tolerant tree, usually growing on dry sites, is an important timber species.  Resin blisters in bark makes it easy to ID.  To 100’. UPL
2, T

PINUS RIGIDA (pitch pine): 3 needles per fascicle.  Large when grown on good sites & protected from fire, scrubby & flat topped when burned.  Usually found on dry sites, sometimes grows in wetlands.  40-80’. FACU
2, T
PLATANUS OCCIDENTALIS (sycamore): a very large eastern hardwood, often forming a massive trunk with exfoliating greenish-brown bark revealing white inner bark. Found on streambanks & floodplains. To 100’. FACW-
2, 3, T
PRUNUS MARITIMA (beach plum): salt tolerant, medium size, rounded shrub of the outer coastal plain from ME to VA.  Attractive, white flowers; its fruit is prized for making jams & jellies.  To 6’. UPL
2, T
PRUNUS SEROTINA (black cherry): medium size, craggy tree in New Jersey.  A valuable timber species in the Mid-west. It has a very wide natural range, with bird-dispersed seed.    50-60’ can reach 100’. FACU
2, 3, T
QUERCUS ALBA (white oak): stately tree of mature woodlands with light gray, flaky bark.  Prefers a deep, moist, well-drained site, will tolerate both wet & dry conditions. 50-80’ can reach 100’. FACU-
2, T
QUERCUS BICOLOR (swamp white oak): large tree of forested wetlands & moist woods.  The best identifying feature is the exfoliating bark on its drooping, thin, lower branches.  50-60’ can reach 100’. FACW+
2, T
QUERCUS COCCINEA (scarlet oak): large tree with deeply cut leaf sinuses.  Usually found growing on dry, sandy or rocky sites.  A major mast producer.  Brilliant red fall color.  70-75’. UPL
2, T
QUERCUS FALCATA (southern red oak):  this medium size tree of the SE U.S. grows best on loamy ridges.  Leaves dark, lustrous green above & grayish green below with characteristic long rounded base. 70-80’. FACU-
2, T
QUERCUS ILICIFOLIA (bear oak): medium size, multi-stemmed shrub or small tree of dry, sandy, or rocky sites.  Usually growing in association with blackjack oak and pitch pine.  An important mast producer.  3-12’. NI
1, T

QUERCUS IMBRICARIA (shingle oak): common plant of well-drained, upland soils with oblong laurel shaped leaves.  Will sometimes naturally hybridize with Black Oak.  50-60’.  FAC
2
QUERCUS MARCROCARPA (bur oak): This drought resistant tree boasts the largest acorn of any of the oaks.  Partially tolerant to shade and competition.  Can handle moist bottomlands.  70-80’.   FAC-
2
QUERCUS MARILANDICA (blackjack oak): small, craggy tree of dry upland or sandy sites often growing with other oaks & pines. Will stay short & shrub-like when exposed to fire as in the NJ Pine Barrens. To 25’. UPL
2, T

QUERCUS PALUSTRIS (pin oak): tall tree of forested wetlands & moist, alluvial woods.  In comparison to other red oaks, the leaves are smaller with deeper sinuses and acorns are smaller.   60-70’. FACW
2, T
QUERCUS PHELLOS (willow oak): found in forested wetlands, flood plains & moist alluvial woods. Large tree with unlobed willow-like leaves. Northern extent of range is central NJ & SE PA.  40-60’ can reach 100’. FAC+
2, T

QUERCUS PRINUS (chestnut oak): large tree of sandy or rocky sites often found growing with black oak, scarlet oak & pitch pine.  Its large sweet acorns are favored by wildlife. 60-70’.  UPL
2, T

QUERCUS RUBRA (northern red oak): very large tree native to much of the eastern United States with the exception of the NJ Pine Barrens.  A prolific mast producer.  60-75’ can reach 100’.  FACU-
2, T
QUERCUS STELLATA (post oak): stately dry-site oak, rarely used in restoration or landscape.  Cross-shaped leaves have distinct blocky middle lobe on both sides.  30-40’.  UPL
2, T
QUERCUS VELUTINA (black oak): medium to large tree of dry, acid sites.  Similar to red oak except for the very blocky bark & fuzzy buds, twigs and leaves.  50-60’ can reach 100’. UPL
2, T
RHODODENDRON VISCOSUM (swamp azalea): medium height, deciduous shrub of forested wetlands and nontidal marsh edges.  Ornamental, fragrant white flowers.  1-8’. OBL
T
RHUS AROMATICA (fragrant sumac): extremely adaptable, durable, spreading shrub, excellent for controlling erosion on slopes, banks & roadcuts.  Striking fall color.  2-6’.  UPL
1, T

RHUS COPALLINUM (winged sumac): mid-size shrub with slightly pubescent stems.  Winged rachis of compound leaves make this plant easy to ID.  Striking fall color.  20-30’. NI
2, T

RHUS GLABRA (smooth sumac): tall shrub with pinnately compound leaves & smooth stems.  Tolerates dry conditions, forms large colonies & has attractive orange-red-purple fall color.  20-30’. UPL
2, T
RHUS TYPHINA (staghorn sumac): large shrub with long pinnately compound leaves & densely hairy, branch tips.  Normally found in large colonies on dry sites, its red & orange fall foliage is spectacular.  15-25’. UPL
2, T

ROSA CAROLINA (pasture rose): stems have straight, needle-like thorns.  Fragrant flowers bloom light pink in early summer.  Found in many habitats from thickets, to open woods, to roadsides.  3-6’.  UPL
1, T
ROSA PALUSTRIS (swamp rose): spreading, thorny, multi-stemmed shrub found in low, wet ground.  Pink flowers mature into bright red rose hips.  To 8’.  OBL
1, T
ROSA VIRGINIANA (Virginia rose): low to medium size shrub.  Flowers are pink, single, solitary.  Found on wet or dry sites.  4-6’. FAC
1, T
SALIX DISCOLOR (pussy willow): a large shrub or small tree with fuzzy flower catkins in the spring before leaves emerge.  Usually found growing in damp thickets, swamps & along streambanks.  20-40’. FACW
2, T

SALIX NIGRA (black willow):  fast-growing, multi-trunk tree common in floodplains & streambanks.  Excellent species for stabilization and soil bio-engineering.  50-100’.   FACW+
2, T
SAMBUCUS CANADENSIS (common elderberry): a fast growing, stoloniferous, multi-stemmed shrub of streambanks & swamps.  Attractive white flowers mature into fruit valued by humans & wildlife.  6-12’. FACW-
1, T
SASSAFRAS ALBIDUM (sassafras): small tree with variable shaped leaves, some entire & some with 2 or 3 lobes.  Spectacular yellow, orange and red fall color.  Birds love the blue berries.  30-60’. FACU-
2, T

SPIRAEA LATIFOLIA (meadowsweet):  small, suckering shrub of low, moist ground & old fields.  White to pink flowers bloom from June through September and are attractive to butterflies. 2-4’. FAC+
1, T
SPIRAEA TOMENTOSA (steeplebush): broadleaf, deciduous shrub of wet meadows, freshwater marshes and shrub swamps.  Pink flowers in dense terminal spires.  To 4’.  FACW
1, T
TAXODIUM DISTICHUM (bald-cypress): narrow-leaved, deciduous conifer of swamps, wetlands and riverbanks. Normally found on very wet soils and tolerant of partial shade.  50-70’ can reach 100’. OBL
2, 3, T
TILIA AMERICANA (american basswood): fast growing tree of sandy loam or loam soils.  Well known as a honey-tree.  Classified as a nitrogen demanding species.  50-70’.  FACU
2, T
VACCINIUM ANGUSTIFOLIUM (lowbush blueberry): low-growing shrub forming dense colonies on dry, sterile soils.  Sweet edible fruit and deep red stem and leaf color in fall.  1-2’.  FACU-
1, T
VACCINIUM CORYMBOSUM (highbush blueberry): medium tall shrub of acidic lowlands.  A plant for all seasons with attractive flowers, tasty fruit, scarlet fall foliage & red winter stem color.  To 12’. FACW-
1, 2, T
VIBURNUM DENTATUM (arrowwood viburnum): rounded shrub of moist soils.  Showy white flowers, pleated foliage, blue berries & site adaptability make it excellent for ornamental or restoration use.  6-15’. FAC
1, T
VIBURNUM LENTAGO (nannyberry): large shrub with slender, arching branches, often forming large clumps.  Like other viburnums, has showy flowers and fruit.  15-20’.  FAC
1, T
VIBURNUM NUDUM (possumhaw):  very attractive midsized shrub of swamps of the inner and outer coastal plain.  Glossy leaves appear varnished.  Fruits in clusters, turning from pink to lavender to blue. 6-8’. OBL
1, T
VIBURNUM PRUNIFOLIUM (blackhaw viburnum): small tree to multi-stemmed shrub found in moist to dry sites.  Pretty, white flowers develop into blue fruit that are eaten by wildlife.  12-16’. FACU
1, T

VIBURNUM TRILOBUM (cranberry viburnum): large shrub, as wide as it is tall.  Bright red fruit is attractive & edible.  Prefers moist, well-drained soil.  Grows as far south as northern New Jersey.  6-12’. FACW
1, T